Individuals in Virginia suffer from concussions from something as simple as a fall to as complicated as a car accident. Head injuries are unpredictable and may not show up immediately and at times may even be ignored by medical professionals. According to ABC News, the Food and Drug Administration may have found a faster way to diagnose some mild traumatic brain injuries.

The device compares clinical diagnosis tools, the imaging of brain function and a blood test to determine the accuracy of a concussion diagnosis. The developers claim that the goal is for trained professionals is to be able to use the device immediately after the injury to accurately diagnose brain abnormalities.

Athletes, soldiers, young people and old people are extremely vulnerable to brain injuries and any brain can be injured at any time. Early intervention after a brain injury can help to improve the prognosis and this test would allow for improved outcomes by deciding early if a mild traumatic brain injury has occurred.

The developer plans to study the test with athletes from Virginia Tech and also those in hospital emergency rooms who have suspected mild brain injuries. The process will include comparing those results with other team members and patients who do not have symptoms of a brain injury.

Although some concussion symptoms may go away quickly, others can affect the individual for the rest of their lives. Some experts believe that the term “mild brain injury” is misleading because the effects can be seen on a behavioral and functioning level for a lifetime. Left untreated or not treated correctly, concussions often leave patients with symptoms and no understanding of why they exist.

Millions of Americans visit emergency rooms each year for traumatic brain injuries and they have become a serious public health concern. This device aims to identify and treat the condition to minimize the lifetime risks associated with brain injuries.